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Five Love(ly) Lesson Ideas

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Hand-holding shadows – Photo taken from ELTpics –  by Sandy Millin, used under a CC Attribution Non-Commercial license 

In this post I wrote about the five Lesson ideas about LOVE I’m going to try out with a group of teenage (intermediate/upper-intermediate level) students next semester.  

LESSON 1

ONE SUMMER by Steve Turner  

Aim:

  • to stimulate students to think and speak about the feelings of missing someone
  • show the students an unconventional use of words in poems

Lead-in

Ask the students:

Is there somebody who is far away from you and you miss him/her badly? How do you feel? 

Task 1: 

Ask the students to read silently the poem which is presented in a paragraph. Then, they try to make their own version of the poem by breaking the poem into separate lines the way they like.

One summer you aeroplaned away, too much money away from me, and stayed there for quite a few missed embraces. Before leaving you smiled me that you’d return all of a mystery moment and would airletter me every few breakfasts in the meantime. This you did, and I thank you most kissingly. I wish however, that I could hijackerplane to the Ignited States of Neon where I’d crash land perfectly in the deserted airport of your heart.

Steve Turner 

Task 2:

Teacher hands out / reads out the original version of the poem “One Summer” by Steve Turner for comparison. Students read / listen to the poem carefully.

ONE SUMMER

One summer you

aeroplaned away,

too much money

away from me, and

stayed there for

quite a few

missed embraces.  

Before leaving

you smiled me that

you’d return all of

a mystery moment and

would airletter me

every few breakfasts

in the meantime.

This

you did, and I thank

you most kissingly.

I

wish however, that I

could hijackerplane

to the Ignited States

of Neon where I’d

crash land perfectly

in the deserted

airport of your heart.

Steve Turner

DSC05457_3

Photo taken from – http://www.morguefile.com/

Task 3: WORDS

  1. Do you like the poem? Do you find it romantic/interesting/playful/funny….?
  2. Are there some strange words in the poem? What do you think they mean?

e.g.

  • aeroplaned away >>  travelled by plane somewhere far away
  • kissingly >>  with love
  • hijackerplane  >>   have an important position in someone’s life
  • deserted airport of your heart >>  most inner and unrevealed part of someone’s heart and mind

Follow-up

Use your own title (e.g. Missed embraces, A deserted airport of your heart, etc.) and:

  • use the keywords in the original poem to make up a new poem
  • rearrange the lines of the original poem to make up a new poem

LESSON 2 

Writing: Finish the story (Write up to 150 words)

Get the students to finish the story “Find-a-Love”

Once upon a time, Find-a-Love, a computer dating organization, did a big advertising campaign. Diane and Terry were students and good friends – they filled out their forms at the same time. As they answered the questions, they discovered they were both looking for the same kind of man. Terry didn’t take it seriously as she was going out with a rather interesting guy at the time. His name was Joe. Diane, on the other hand, hadn’t been out with anyone in months. Several weeks later, Diane and Terry each received a list of five names from Find-a-Love. Diane was rather surprised to find Joe’s name on the list. “Aha,” she thought. “So he sent in a form too.” She had heard a lot about Joe but she wasn’t sure he knew about her. She wondered what to do.    

LESSON 3

Reading and speaking: “Love Is A Fallacy”

5-falacies

Get the students to read Max Shulman’s short story “Love Is A Fallacy” at home in order to talk the next class about the most common types of logical fallacies.

This is Max Shulman’s  love_is_a_fallacy

[ A list of some common logical fallacies: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/fallacies/

A more detailed list of logical fallacies http://www.iep.utm.edu/fallacy/ ]  

LESSON 4

Vocabulary: Find some fun facts about Love vocabulary.

For example:

  • Love (in tennis, squash, and some other sports) – a score of zero; nil: love fifteen

It’s often said that the equivalent term love in tennis and some other games for a zero score likewise derives from the shape of an egg, in this case the French l’oeuf. There is no known such link between the French word and the English one, and the term love is recorded in English in 1742, in Hoyle’s famous book on the game of whist, a century before anybody used the egg analogy in cricket, and even longer before the game of lawn tennis was invented. (Though real tennis is several centuries older, it didn’t use the term.) It is probable that love is from playing for love, that is, for pleasure rather than money, so that it doesn’t matter if one hasn’t (yet) scored.

Read more here:  http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-bre2.htm  

  • to be head over heels in loveone has fallen madly in love in an impetuous and unconstrained way

It’s more than a little weird when you think about it — what’s so strange about having one’s head over one’s heels? After all, we do spend most of our waking lives in that position. It looks so odd because during its history it got turned upside down, just like the idea it represents. When it first appeared, back in the fourteenth century, it was written as heels over head, which makes a lot more sense. Logically, it meant to be upside down, or, as to turn heels over head, to turn a somersault. It became inverted around the end of the eighteenth century, it seems as the result of a series of mistakes by authors who didn’t stop to think about the conventional phrase they were writing.

Read more here: Head over heels http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-hea3.htm

  • Can you find some other interesting words/phrases/idioms connected with Love?

LESSON 5

Get the students to write the opening line of a story / poem / tweet (140 characters) based on the photo below while listening to the sound of waves on Sound of our shores site:

TASOS, LIMENAS 091  

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About ljiljana havran

English language teacher (General & Aviation English), passionate about learning and teaching. Curious, adventurous, a lifelong learner. Love: good books, music, lots of dance.

2 responses »

  1. Hi Ljiljana,
    You could also exploit the ELTpics ‘Love and Romance’ set: https://www.flickr.com/photos/eltpics/sets/72157629301043891
    Have fun!
    Sandy

    Reply

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